Great Beginnings

When our puppies leave to go to their forever homes, we have spent the previous 8-9 weeks loving them, socializing them, helping them get off on the right paw(s) so to speak to the best of our ability. They have been raised around their human family, fed the best food to help them grow physically, wormed multiple times and vaccinated. Two of the programs we adhere to is the "Super Dog" or Early Neurological Stimulation and the Pat Hastings Rules of Seven.

 

 

 

 

Early Neurological Stimulation

The BioSensor program assures that each Lab puppy, from only a few days after birth, will be neurologically stimulated and socially acclimated in a scientific manner that encourages socialization while maximizing positive personality traits and development.These five exercises will produce neurological stimulations, none of which naturally occur during this early period of life. Experience shows that sometimes pups will resist these exercises, others will appear unconcerned. These exercises impact the neurological system by kicking it into action earlier than would be normally expected, the result being an increased capacity that later will help to make the difference in its performance.

Benefits of BioSensor Therapy

The BioSensor Program improves the development of the puppy's neurological systems by early stimulation and stress, resulting in the following benefits for the life of the dog.

1. Improved Cardiovascular Performance

2. Stronger Heart Beats

3. Stronger Adrenal Glands

4. More Tolerance to Stress

5. Greater Lifetime Resistance to Disease


Each workout involved handling puppies once each day. The workouts required handling them one at a time while performing a series of five exercises. Listed in no order of preference the handler starts with one pup and stimulates it using each of the five exercises. The handler completes the series from beginning to end before starting with the next pup. The handling of each pup once per day involves the following exercises (each stimulation to last no longer than 3-5 seconds):

1. Tactile stimulation - holding the pup in one hand, the handler gently stimulates (tickles) the pup between the toes on any one foot using a Q-tip. It is not necessary to see that the pup is feeling the tickle.

2. Head held erect - using both hands, the pup is held perpendicular to the ground, (straight up), so that its head is directly above its tail. This is an upwards position.

3. Head pointed down - holding the pup firmly with both hands the head is reversed and is pointed downward so that it is pointing towards the ground.

4. Supine position - hold the pup so that its back is resting in the palm of both hands with its muzzle facing the ceiling. The pup while on its back is allowed to sleep/struggle.

5. Thermal stimulation - use a damp towel that has been cooled in a refrigerator for at least five minutes. Place the pup on the towel, feet down. Do not restrain it from moving

 

 

Rules of Seven by Pat Hastings

By the time a puppy is 7 weeks old it should have:
  • Been on 7 different surfaces, such as: carpet, concrete, wood, vinyl, grass, dirt, gravel, wood chips, newspaper, etc.
 
  • Played with 7 different types of objects, such as: big balls, small balls, soft fabric toys, fuzzy balls, squeaky toys, metal items, wooden items, paper/cardboard items, milk/soda jugs, etc.
 
  • Been in 7 different locations, including: front yard, backyard, basement, kitchen, car, garage, laundry room, bathroom, crate, kennel, etc.
 
  • Been exposed to 7 challenges, such as: climbed a box, climbed off a box, gone through a tunnel, climbed up steps, climbed down steps, climbed over obstacles, played hide and seek, gone in and out of a doorway with a step, etc.
 
  • Eaten from 7 different containers: metal, plastic, cardboard, paper, china, pie plate, frying pan, etc.
 
  • Eaten in 7 different locations: crate, yard, kitchen, basement, laundry room, bedroom, x-pen, etc.
 
  • Met and played with 7 new people, including children and the elderly

©2006-2019 EverOak Labradors ~ All content and photographs on this site is personal private property and is not to be downloaded, shared or reproduced without the prior written consent of EverOak Labradors. No one is allowed to LINK to any of our pages without prior permission.